STD’s Sexually Transmitted diseases and preventions

Introduction

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are spread from one person to another through sexual contact. You can prevent STDs by not having sex, or by being in a long-term relationship with a partner who has been tested and has negative STD test results; this is sometimes referred to as monogamy. Wait until you’re older to start having sex, the younger you are when you first have sex, the more likely you are to get an STD. Get tested regularly for STDs and ask your partner to do the same. Get vaccinated against HPV and hepatitis B, both of which can cause cancer

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections transmitted from an infected person to an uninfected person through sexual contact.

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that can be passed from one person to another through sexual contact. They’re caused by germs, including bacteria and viruses.

Some STDs can be transmitted by:

  • Oral sex (mouth-to-genital contact)
  • Anal sex (penis in the anus)

You can prevent sexually transmitted infections by abstaining from sex, being in a long-term relationship with someone who has been tested and is STD-free, or using condoms.

You can prevent sexually transmitted infections by not having sex, or by being in a long-term relationship with a partner who has been tested and has negative STD test results; this is sometimes referred to as monogamy.

Avoid risky sexual behavior, including:

  • Having multiple sex partners. This increases your risk of getting an STD because you do not know if they are infected or not. You may also be at greater risk for other types of STDs that are spread through skin-to-skin contact (e.g., herpes).
  • Having sex with someone who does not have been tested for sexually transmitted diseases and/or gonorrhea (the bacteria that causes gonorrhea). If you do choose to have unprotected sex with someone who is infected with one type of virus like hepatitis B or C then make sure they get treated right away so they don’t pass those viruses back onto you!

Wait until you’re older to start having sex, the younger you are when you first have sex, the more likely you are to get an STD.

The younger you are when you first have sex, the more likely you are to get an STD. The younger you are when you first have sex, the more likely it is that your first time will be with someone who has an STD. So if your goal is to avoid getting an STD and preventing pregnancy or depression, then wait until a later age before having sex for the first time (if at all).

Get tested regularly for STDs and ask your partner to do the same.

The best way to prevent an STD is to get tested regularly, ask your partner about their sexual history and current practices, and find out whether they have been tested recently for STDs. If you are unsure about the safety of a person’s sexual practices or if you don’t know how often someone has been tested for STDs then it would be advisable to avoid engaging in any intimate activity with them until more information is available.

Get vaccinated against HPV and hepatitis B, both of which can cause cancer.

Get vaccinated against HPV and hepatitis B, both of which can cause cancer.

HPV is spread through skin-to-skin contact. It’s a very common sexually transmitted disease (STD) that affects the genitals, mouth and throat. If you don’t know how to prevent it or if you’ve been exposed to someone else who has HPV but haven’t gotten tested yet, talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated against it before any symptoms appear.

HPV vaccine is recommended for boys and girls age 11 or 12 years old.

Use condoms correctly each time you have sex. During oral sex, use dental dams.

Use a new condom each time you have sex.

Use a latex condom for vaginal, anal and oral sex.

Don’t use oil-based lubricants such as lotion or petroleum jelly with latex condoms.

Talk with your partner about STDs before you start having sex.

Talk with your partner about STDs before you start having sex. Be honest about your own STD testing history, and ask your partner about his or her sexual history and current sexual practices. Find out whether your partner has been tested recently for STDs and ask when was the last time he or she was tested. If it’s been more than six months since your last checkup, schedule an appointment with a health care provider for STD testing now.

If you have any doubts about whether to have sex with someone who has an STD (sexually transmitted diseases), don’t do it! Even if they tell you that they’ve been tested and are clear of infection—and especially if they say “it’s nothing,” this doesn’t mean that every person who test negative will also be infected by that organism; there could still be others out there who haven’t yet been diagnosed with the condition(s) being transmitted in question(s).

Conclusion

STD testing is easy and free, but it’s important to get tested regularly. It’s also important to talk with your partner about STD testing before you have sex. If you’re concerned about an STD, talk with a health care provider about what tests are available and how often they need to be done.

Source: Euchariasblog