Polio: Virus, Causes, Symptoms, Transmission & Treatment

Polio is a highly infectious viral disease spread from person to person, mainly via the faecal-oral route. The virus is transmitted by consuming food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person, or through a droplet spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It can also be transmitted by contact with objects that have been contaminated by poliovirus and through oral/nasal secretions e.g. hand-to-mouth transmission after changing diapers of an infected child with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). Polio cases have reduced by over 99% since 1988, from an estimated more than 350 000 cases then, to 37 reported cases in 2016. The reduction is the result of a global effort led by national governments WHO Rotary International (Rotary), CDC US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF key partners). Thanks to success of polio eradication activities no country has been re-infected wild poliovirus imported from another country since February 2014

Polio is a highly infectious viral disease spread from person to person, mainly via the faecal-oral route.

Polio is a highly infectious viral disease spread from person to person, mainly via the faecal-oral route. Poliovirus is excreted in faeces for about 2 weeks and can cause acute flaccid paralysis of the muscles used for breathing, swallowing and talking.

Polio spreads through contaminated food or water that has been contaminated with infected faeces (stool). It can also be spread by contact between people who are not vaccinating themselves with polio vaccination. The virus can remain active on surfaces for up to 6 hours after an infected person leaves a room or area where they were shedding virus particles

The virus is transmitted by consuming food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person, or through a droplet spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

The virus is transmitted by consuming food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person, or through a droplet spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Polio is mainly spread through fecal-oral route (the virus can be found in human feces) and can also be transmitted by contact with contaminated respiratory secretions. It’s rare for someone to get polio just from touching another person who has polio; the main way the virus spreads is through airborne droplets from coughing and sneezing.

It is also transmitted through contact with an object contaminated by poliovirus and by oral/nasal secretions e.g. through hand-to-mouth transmission after changing diapers of an infected child with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP).

Polio is also transmitted through contact with an object contaminated by poliovirus and by oral/nasal secretions e.g. through hand-to-mouth transmission after changing diapers of an infected child with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP).

Polio cases have reduced by over 99% since 1988, from an estimated more than 350 000 cases then, to 37 reported cases in 2016.

Polio cases have reduced by over 99% since 1988, from an estimated more than 350 000 cases then, to 37 reported cases in 2016. The reduction is the result of the global effort to eradicate polio led by national governments and supported by WHO.

The reduction is the result of the global effort to eradicate the disease led by national governments, WHO, Rotary International (Rotary), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF and key partners.

You may have heard about this virus or know someone who has it. Polio is a highly infectious disease caused by a virus that can paralyze parts of your nervous system and leave you with lifelong disabilities.

In 1988, polio was endemic in 125 countries and territories—an area covering 4 percent of the world’s land surface; but by 2012 it had been eradicated from all remaining countries except Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Thanks to the success of polio eradication activities, no country has been re-infected by wild poliovirus imported from another country since February 2014.

Thanks to the success of polio eradication activities, no country has been re-infected by wild poliovirus imported from another country since February 2014. The last case of wild poliovirus importation was reported in Lagos, Nigeria on July 25, 2016. Since then there have been no cases of polio in Nigeria and all other countries where importation had been a problem have stopped reporting any new infections since November 2015 (Horn of Africa).

In response to these successes we are now seeing fewer countries reporting new infections than we did during our first few years working on this issue together (in 2011-2012). There are currently only four new cases reported each month: three from Afghanistan and one each from Pakistan and India; however this number may increase as we approach December when many children go back to school after summer holidays

This is one of the most important public health achievements in history.

Polio has been eradicated in over 99% of the world. In 2016, there were only 37 cases reported globally and no country has been re-infected by wild poliovirus imported from another country since February 2014.

How polio spreads?

Oral polio:

Polio is a highly infectious viral disease spread from person to person, mainly via the faecal-oral route. The virus is transmitted by consuming food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person, or through a droplet spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Poliovirus spreads from person to person primarily through the fecal-oral route and multiplies in the intestines where it can invade the nervous system and cause paralysis.

Poliovirus spreads from person to person primarily through the fecal-oral route and multiplies in the intestines where it can invade the nervous system and cause paralysis.

Poliovirus is a highly infectious virus that causes polio, a disease that can cause paralysis in children. It’s typically spread through water or food contaminated by infected feces (stools), but also can be transmitted by direct contact with saliva or mucus droplets of an infected person as well as indirect contact with objects (such as toys) contaminated by their saliva or feces. Polio is preventable through vaccination against all strains of poliovirus; however, some areas may still have active outbreaks due to low vaccination rates among young children

Polio is a highly infectious viral disease which spreads easily from person to person

Polio is a highly infectious viral disease which spreads easily from person to person. The virus can be transmitted by consuming food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person and also through contact with an object contaminated with poliovirus.

Poliomyelitis is caused by infection with polio virus, which causes paralysis in nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control muscles used for movement and breathing.

Conclusion

Polio is a highly infectious viral disease which spreads easily from person to person and can cause paralysis. Polio is caused by infection with a virus called poliovirus, which is spread through the faecal-oral route. Polio cases have reduced by over 99% since 1988, from an estimated more than 350 000 cases then, to 37 reported cases in 2016. The reduction is the result of the global effort led by national governments, WHO, Rotary International (Rotary), US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF”

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